The Sale Rack

We all know sometimes it isn't realistic to just shop vintage or secondhand. We are a culture of consumerism, materialism and trends. If you think about it, that's the foundation of our prosperity. So if that's the case, how do we still make a positive impact on a wasteful industry, while still being about to shop for new clothing?

Source: tumblr.com

Source: tumblr.com

The answer is the sale rack. Many of the clothes that end up on the sale rack and not sold sometimes end up in discount stores like T.J Maxx, Ross or their outlet stores. Rarely, it might get donated to Goodwill but the majority of times, it ends up in landfills, burned, shredded and destroyed. Many companies prioritize protecting their brand & exclusivity of their products. Whether it's an expensive brand like Valentino or a more less amusing brand like Abercrombie & Fitch, they both work equally as hard to make sure their product ends up in the "right" hands and remains of "value."

I like to think that buying from a sale rack is almost like buying secondhand. You are preventing the clothing from going to a landfill which in the end is still a positive. Will this change companies and their drive to keep producing the way they do? Maybe not, but it at least challenges you to save a little money and get creative with what you see on sale.  

And with that money that you save sifting through sale racks, treat yourself to an experience... travel somewhere new, try a new fancy restaurant, treat your friends for drinks... Options are limitless when you have a little extra $$.

Happy bargain hunting.

Source: tumblr.com

Source: tumblr.com

Now for a closing question...

Can you feel good, but also "look good" through buying secondhand & unwanted items on sale?

We'll explore that another time.